Does 9/11 still touch a nerve?

Standard

My answer to Does 9/11 still touch a nerve?

Answer by Ken Larson:

It did – for a time – We thought we were untouchable and we were touched – big time. It took awhile to deal with the grief. I knew several at the Pentagon that died.

Then we began to morph our disbelief and our grief into a mammoth effort to strike back without considering what we were striking and with motives that became greedy and profiteering in nature.

For me it was very reminiscent of the Vietnam era in which I served and in retrospect I feel badly about the many weapons systems on which I worked for years that are currently in use today to kill so dramatically from the sky.

We must grasp the series of Cause and Effect Events that created 911 and subsequent carnage and insure that it does not happen again. The U.S. and its allies (many in the Middle East) were involved. We must understand theses events and learn from them.

Military Victory is Dead

CAUSE: The US fights a just and honorable war assisting many Middle East allies and other countries free Kuwait.

EFFECT: Saddam Hussein is driven from Kuwait and the country is returned to its rightful government.

CAUSE: The US does not leave the Middle East after rescuing Kuwait, but rather, stays in peripheral countries militarily “To Protect Our Interests” with an imperialist attitude resented by cultures that have an ingrained,religious hatred for that type of presence by foreigners.

EFFECT: The rise of Bin Laden and many more like him today and the deaths of 3,000 Americans on our soil, attacked in our homeland because we did not leave the Middle East.

CAUSE: The US reacts to 911 by setting up an elaborate Homeland Security apparatus and beefing up the National Security Agency by orders of magnitude, technologically, while putting in place a carefully concealed legal apparatus to counter terrorism.

EFFECT: The US has no outside terrorist incidents of a 911 magnitude since the Twin Towers fell in 2001 but Americans develop real concerns about our government and its role in controlling our lives as whistle blower disclosures regarding the apparatus of intelligence operation reveal potential constitutional issues.

CAUSE: The US invades Iraq fed by false, intentionally staged intelligence, fronted by agencies and industries bent on economic gain. The US sets about war fighting and nation building programs that seek to displace a culture that had evolved through conflict and war lords for hundreds of years and is tied to the absolute requirement that religious practices be part and parcel of government, a principle the US has rejected as unworkable since our Constitution was written.

EFFECT: Failure to build anything substantial in the form of a nation over a 15 year period. The deaths or crippling of our finest soldiers, dramatic increases in our national debt and a cynicism among our citizens with respect to the $Billions that have gone into the pockets of corporations supporting our huge Military Industrial Complex (MIC) and wasteful USAID Programs by companies that spend more lobbying Congress than they pay in taxes.

CAUSE: The present Middle East unrest due to ISIS/ISIL and other splinter groups we thought had been scattered to the winds.

EFFECT: UN Security Council meets with many nations talking and less than a half dozen nations carefully and selectively participating in an air war against terrorism while the remainder watch the outcome. Our military and corporate defense establishment (MIC) shout, “Sequestration to reduce military spending must end!” and estimates two years will be required with more American boots on the ground to train an Iraq force that we had already trained for a decade before the Iraq government disbanded it.

CAUSE (PROJECTED): A political battle like none seen in recent times driven by concerned American citizens and their view of the US role in the Middle East, our burgeoning national debt approaching $20 Trillion and the fact that the culture in that part of the world has had a very difficult time figuring out how we can help them over the last two decades while we near energy independence from oil and require some nation building of our own in the homeland.

EFFECT (PROJECTED): A leader and a political climate that will permit prudence, tough decisions, carefully avoidance of bad intelligence and overreaction so that we do not continue to sink into the oil and blood soaked desert of Middle East cultural revolutions as global corporations consuming the MIC and USAID tax payer dollars prosper, parking their assets overseas while our young become indebted for generations.

Does 9/11 still touch a nerve?

What is the single most important piece of management advice you’d give a new entrepreneur?

Standard

My answer to What is the single most important piece of management advice you'd give a new entrepreneur?

Answer by Ken Larson:

Know how much leadership to offer and how much to let the individual grow on his or her own. Strike the right balance between specific and generic guidance so the unique individual traits of the workers come through in the business model and solutions to problems, system design and success of the firm are derived from the people running the enterprise and not from the leader.

What is the single most important piece of management advice you'd give a new entrepreneur?

How can I make money with a blog on Blogger?

Standard

My answer to How can I make money with a blog on Blogger?

Answer by Ken Larson:

I have been blogging for 10 years. I have found through hard experience that it is best to divide opinions from professional assistance offerings.

I have Google Adsense and site metering on both the sites I maintain.

The Blog containing professional assistance to small business earns orders of magnitude more traffic than the opinion blog and proportionately more earnings. People want help more than they want opinions. See below graphic for traffic comparisons on the last 7 years. Neither site has made me rich and I did not set them up for that purpose.

SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING (SBFGC)

Rose Covered Glasses

It took the better part of a year to build up traffic. I view blogging as an auxiliary enhancement to marketing my non-profit foundation as well as the foundations I support and staying in touch with Veteran Issues.

The most useful feature of blogging to me is a time saver. I can write an article once and send 50 clients to it in the course of my advisory work. That saves me enormous amounts of time.

I spend roughly 3 hours a day blogging and site maintenance, maintaining books and reference materials in BOX at the sites free to the public. The majority of my time is devoted to counseling specific small business clients and blogging is vital to that mission.

How can I make money with a blog on Blogger?

What freedoms do Americans take for granted?

Standard

My answer to What freedoms do Americans take for granted?

Answer by Ken Larson:

When one travels to other countries as I have and regularly counsels small businesses on several continents as a volunteer counselor in retirment with Micro Mentor, one realizes how lucky Americans are to have the following:

  • a constitutional republic that mandates democratic practices
  • a bill of rights
  • a separation of powers
  • and a rule of law that makes it all work.

When we take a moment and ask ourselves if we could succeed or have the opportunities we have anywhere else on the face of the earth we should realize we complain way too much.

What freedoms do Americans take for granted?

Why Americans allow the public infrastructure to fail?

Standard

My answer to Why Americans allow the public infrastructure to fail?

Answer by Ken Larson:

We are kicking the can down the road until it bounces back to hurt us enough that we bring our interventionist war dollars home and conduct come preventive logistics instead of war profiteering.

Someone will then make a big buck at preventing debacles like the 35W Bridge collapse in Minnesota and similar events. That is the good old “American Way”.

Dramatic Pictures of Minnesota Bridge Collapse

Why Americans allow the public infrastructure to fail?

Why do people in USA has so much weapons?

Standard

My answer to Why do people in USA has so much weapons?

Answer by Ken Larson:

Under the category of weapons, I will add to the discussion among those who have touched on gun control issues – the following motivator:

Money, corporate greed and promoting warfare in the world.

“DEFENSE NEWS”

“The US hit $33.6 billion for foreign weapon sales in fiscal year 2016.

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced Tuesday that it cleared $2.9 billion of Foreign Military Financing-funded cases; $5.0 billion in Building Partner Capacity-funded cases; and $25.7 billion funded by partner nations.

Among sales that were cleared in 2016 were $785 million from the UAE for munitions such as the GBU-10, announced in July; $1.2 billion from Australia for AIM-120D air-to-air missiles; and $1.15 billion from Saudi Arabia for M1A2S tanks and M88Al/A2 vehicles.

The drop from the 2015 total was predicted last month by DSCA head Vice Adm. Joseph Rixey, who argued that the total overall figure is not a barometer his agency uses to judge its success.

“We don’t look at sales like a benchmark we’re trying to capture. It’s not a number we’re trying to go for. Sales is really a fundamental result of foreign policy. We just have to understand what kind of workforce we’re going to need to prosecute those sales,” Rixey said then. “It’s nothing more than a tool for us to anticipate what we’re going to anticipate and work with.”

As an example, Rixey pointed out that if the long-awaited sale of fighter jets to Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain had been cleared in 2016, as many had expected, the total would have eclipsed the record-setting year of 2015.”

US Weapons Exports End FY 2016 at $33.6 Billion

Why do people in USA has so much weapons?

What standards do U.S. military weapons and equipment have to be made to?

Standard

My answer to What standards do U.S. military weapons and equipment have to be made to?

Answer by Ken Larson:

As others have stated, Military Standards have been the norm for many years.

Having worked for over 4 decades with them I can assure you that in many cases they were very exotic and wasteful, representing a bureaucratic approach to perpetuating costly quality and support functions that were not necessary. (Witness – the toilet seat and coffee pot scandals at NASA and the white elephants along the way at the Pentagon, driven to extremes by Mil Spec engineering thinking).

Of late, the Pentagon has been utilizing commercial-off- the shelf products that are not Mil-Spec, driven primarily by cost and the fact that the Silicon Valley companies like Google, Amazon and Microsoft, to name a few, are setting the pace in security and technology.

Use of commercial components has created a market for counterfeits and uncontrolled inventories of potentially dangerous parts.

I foresee a hybrid form of Mil Spec evolving that combines the best of both worlds, deals with security, piracy, counterfeit parts and similar risks while making the most of what our high tech commercial companies can offer.

The genre will probably not be called Mil Spec, but a term that connotes the mix. The military is great at inventing acronyms. Watch for this one.

What standards do U.S. military weapons and equipment have to be made to?

New Army Unit -The Multi-Domain Task Force

Standard
Army Multiple Domain Master Sgt Baumgartner, Air Force

Image: Master Sgt Baumgartner, Air Force

“The Army is creating an experimental combat unit to develop new tactics for lethally fast-paced future battlefields.

While small, it will have capabilities not found in the building block of today’s Army, the 4,000-strong brigade.

The Multi-Domain Task Force will be “a relatively small organization…1,500 or so troops,” the Army Chief of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, told the Future of Warfare conference here this morning.  “That organization will be capable of space, cyber, maritime, air, and ground warfare,” he said, extending its reach into all domains of military operations to support the Air Force, Navy, and Marines.

“It’s got a bunch of capabilities, and that’s what we’re going to play with to figure out what’s the right mix,” Lt. Gen. Joseph Anderson, the deputy chief of staff for operations (G-3/5/7), told reporters at last week’s Association of the US Army conference. “It’s got some aviation. It’s got some maneuver. It’s got signal. It’s got cyber.” In English, that means it has helicopters, infantry and/or tanks, communications troops, and technical troops to protect (and perhaps attack) computer networks. By contrast, a typical Army brigade today, a much larger formation, has maneuver and signal, but no helicopters or hackers.

The eventual goal of this experimentation may be permanent units that are so self-sufficient. The old Cold War-era Armored Cavalry Regiments had their own in-house helicopters, as well as tanks, signallers and supply to conduct reconnaissance at high speeds over large areas in the face of armed opposition. Army reformers from Doug MacGregor to H.R. McMaster, both veterans of ACRs, have seen these self-sufficient units as a potential model for future forces. The Army recently explored reviving them, but “we don’t have the stuff to build it,” in particular the helicopters, Anderson said.

“There’s still not consensus about what this thing” — the revived ACR or Reconnaissance-Strike Group — “should look like, how big it should be,” said Anderson. “That doesn’t mean we’re not going to keep striving to build that kind of capability….I think in the meantime this Multi-Domain Task Force may provide pieces, parts, of what that RSG was going to be.”

Why the drive for smaller units with a wider range of capabilities? The Army increasingly worries that big units will just be big targets. Russia and China, in particular, have developed their own smart missiles, plus the sensors to find targets and the networks to coordinate strikes. These Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) systems have the range and accuracy to potentially make wide areas of Europe and Asia — including the territory of allies like the Baltics, Poland, and South Korea — a deadly no-go zone for conventional US forces.

“There are several nations around the world who have developed very complex, very sophisticated Anti-Access/Area Denial sort of capabilities,” Milley said. “Obviously Russia and China, to a lesser extent Iran and North Korea…. That A2/AD structure is highly lethal and operating inside that structure, in large formations, will also get you killed.”

“So smaller dispersed, very agile, very nimble organizations — that are networked into other lethal systems that delivered by either air or maritime forces — will be essential to rip apart the A2/AD networks,” Milley said. “These organizations would be highly lethal, very fast, very difficult to pin down on a battlefield.”

The Army can’t maneuver this way today, emphasized Maj. Gen. Duane Gamble, the logistician heading the Europe-based 21st Theater Sustainment Command. “We don’t have the mission command capabilities that can do that. We don’t have the sustainment capabilities,” he told me at AUSA. “But where we’re getting the reps in is widely dispersed operations at the company level, sometimes at the platoon level, training with our allies, and we’re learning the vulnerabilities of our heavy formations (i.e. tank units). Their internal logistics are designed to operate in battalion sectors… So all that is informing what we need to do in the future.”

Not everyone is excited. At the AUSA conference in Huntsville, an analyst, historian and top aide to Milley’s predecessor, retired Col. David Johnson, warns we may have already overloaded Brigade Combat Team commanders with too many capabilities that once were managed by divisions or even corps. “The BCT has become the division… the focal point of just about everything. We ought to challenge that assertion,” Johnson said. “Should we keep pushing capabilities down to the BCT or relook the role of divisions and corps, and focus the brigade on the close fight?”

The head of Training & Doctrine Command (TRADOC), Gen. David Perkins answers: “You’re (still) going to have to have echelons of command that synchronize and deconflict. That won’t change — but how those responsibilities and authorities are divided may have to. A whole generation of Army leaders grew up with Airland Battle doctrine’s clear demarcations between the close fight, conducted by short-range weapons; the deep fight, conducted by Air Force strikes, attack helicopters, and ATACMS missiles; and the supposedly safe rear area.

“A lot of it was determined by range of weapons. It was determined by physics, it was determined by geography, (e.g.) here’s a bridge crossing, who’s in charge of it?” Perkins told me at AUSA. “What we’re finding with multi-domain battle (is) that construct doesn’t work…. What’s the range of cyber?…You can’t define the battlefield framework by the range and/or limit of your weapons.”

“What we tried to do with a two-dimensional construct, AirLand Battle, was impose some order on the chaos that is battle(:) I own this part of chaos, you own this part of chaos,” Perkins said. “Now… instead of trying to control chaos, we have to thrive in it.”

http://breakingdefense.com/2017/03/new-army-unit-to-test-tactics-meet-the-multi-domain-task-force/

 

How is Obama responsible for the formation of the modern ISIS/ISOL/”Islamic State” fighting force?

Standard

My answer to How is Obama responsible for the formation of the modern ISIS/ISOL/"Islamic State" fighting force?

Answer by Ken Larson:

No.

We must grasp the series of Cause and Effect Events that created ISIS. The U.S. and its allies (many in the Middle East) were involved. We must understand theses events and learn from them.

CAUSE: The US fights a just and honorable war assisting many Middle East allies and other countries free Kuwait.

EFFECT: Saddam Hussein is driven from Kuwait and the country is returned to its rightful government.

CAUSE: The US does not leave the Middle East after rescuing Kuwait, but rather, stays in peripheral countries militarily “To Protect Our Interests” with an imperialist attitude resented by cultures that have an ingrained,religious hatred for that type of presence by foreigners.

EFFECT: The rise of Bin Laden and many more like him today and the deaths of 3,000 Americans on our soil, attacked in our homeland because we did not leave the Middle East.

CAUSE: The US reacts to 911 by setting up an elaborate Homeland Security apparatus and beefing up the National Security Agency by orders of magnitude, technologically, while putting in place a carefully concealed legal apparatus to counter terrorism.

EFFECT: The US has no outside terrorist incidents of a 911 magnitude since the Twin Towers fell in 2001 but Americans develop real concerns about our government and its role in controlling our lives as whistle blower disclosures regarding the apparatus of intelligence operation reveal potential constitutional issues.

CAUSE: The US invades Iraq fed by false, intentionally staged intelligence, fronted by agencies and industries bent on economic gain. The US sets about war fighting and nation building programs that seek to displace a culture that had evolved through conflict and war lords for hundreds of years and is tied to the absolute requirement that religious practices be part and parcel of government, a principle the US has rejected as unworkable since our Constitution was written.

EFFECT: Failure to build anything substantial in the form of a nation over a 15 year period. The deaths or crippling of our finest soldiers, dramatic increases in our national debt and a cynicism among our citizens with respect to the $Billions that have gone into the pockets of corporations supporting our huge Military Industrial Complex (MIC) and wasteful USAID Programs by companies that spend more lobbying Congress than they pay in taxes.

CAUSE: The present Middle East unrest due to ISIS/ISIL and other splinter groups we thought had been scattered to the winds.

EFFECT: UN Security Council meets with many nations talking and less than a half dozen nations carefully and selectively participating in an air war against terrorism while the remainder watch the outcome. Our military and corporate defense establishment (MIC) shout, “Sequestration to reduce military spending must end!” and estimates two years will be required with more American boots on the ground to train an Iraq force that we had already trained for a decade before the Iraq government disbanded it.

CAUSE (PROJECTED): A political battle like none seen in recent times driven by concerned American citizens and their view of the US role in the Middle East, our burgeoning national debt approaching $20 Trillion and the fact that the culture in that part of the world has had a very difficult time figuring out how we can help them over the last two decades while we near energy independence from oil and require some nation building of our own in the homeland.

EFFECT (PROJECTED): A leader and a political climate that will permit prudence, tough decisions, carefully avoidance of bad intelligence and overreaction so that we do not continue to sink into the oil and blood soaked desert of Middle East cultural revolutions as global corporations consuming the MIC and USAID tax payer dollars prosper, parking their assets overseas while our young become indebted for generations.

How is Obama responsible for the formation of the modern ISIS/ISOL/"Islamic State" fighting force?

Why are there more cases of PTSD in present day veterans than there were in Vietnam and the wars before it?

Standard

My answer to Why are there more cases of PTSD in present day veterans than there were in Vietnam and the wars befor…

Answer by Ken Larson:

Identification of PTSD and treatment for it did not become available after the Vietnam war until the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. Even then the attitude of the military veteran about seeking help had not advanced to the point where it is today.

In 1968, I came home from serving two US Army tours in Vietnam, having been awarded five medals, including a Bronze Star. During my second tour I acquired Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Depression. Treatment would not become available for either ailment until the mid to late 70's. Returning to the University of Minnesota at Morris, I found that most of my former classmates were either facing the military draft or were violently against the war. I was not their favorite person.

Feeling isolated and alone, I was unable to relate to my family due to untreated Depression and PTSD. Disillusioned with school, I moved to Minneapolis Minnesota and began a career in the Defense Industrial Complex that would span over three decades from 1969 through 2005.

By the time treatment for PTSD and Depression became available, I had such high security clearances that had I been treated for these disorders, the US Government would have revoked my clearances and my career would have ended or would have been sharply curtailed. This quandary led to my journey through the Defense Industrial Complex. I found that accepting extreme challenges and succeeding at them became a way to displace PTSD and elevate depressive moods. For extended periods of time this method of self-management led to a satisfying, although somewhat adventurous and diversified life. However, down periods always occurred, especially after the latest challenge had been met. A new challenge was then required.

In early 2005, approaching age sixty, I found myself unable to self-manage an extremely deep depressive episode. The journey had simply wound down. This situation nearly resulted in an end to my life. Recovering with help from my family and the US Veteran's Administration, I now reside in a veteran's home, volunteering to Small, Veteran-Owned, Women-Owned and Minority-Owned businesses that are pursuing contracts with the Federal Government.

ODYSSEY OF ARMAMENTS

Why are there more cases of PTSD in present day veterans than there were in Vietnam and the wars before it?