Tag Archives: Silicon Valley technology

Silicon Valley Will Never Love The Pentagon

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Silcon Valley will Never Love DOD

“C4ISRNET.COM”

“In early April the New York Times reported 3,100 Google employees signed a letter asking the company to pull out of a DoD program called Project Maven.

In short, that program would use Google’s artificial intelligence to help identify objects in drone video. Eventually, those objects could become targets. Google employees objected to this collaboration and that their talents were used as a weapon of war.”

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[RELATED:  She Kills People From 7,850 Miles Away  ]

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“C4ISRNET”

“For years, senior Department of Defense leaders have preached a message of speed. Buy faster. Test faster. Fail faster. Succeed faster. Get new capabilities out to the troops faster.

Faster, faster, faster.

Representatives from industry nod and say yes, faster is a start but, honestly, even faster would be better.

And so, the question naturally becomes, if everyone wants to go faster — the leaders want to go faster, and the folks on the front line want to go faster and the defense industry wants to go faster — what’s the holdup?

Inevitably, the answer is middle management. DoD bureaucracy is mired in the habit of moving slow. How it was is how it will forever be.

The problem, almost everyone says, is culture.

For several years now, the Pentagon has been reaching out to Silicon Valley as a way to, you guessed it, move faster. It has opened offices and assembled boards and advisors with Silicon Valley luminaries serving as liaisons to the Pentagon. Senior leaders have made approximately a billion jokes about having to wear a hoodie to work. The head of Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc., is on the board of the Pentagon’s advisory committee.

Pentagon leaders have not made a convincing case as to why their dollars and their vision to change the world are any more altruistic than the next guy with billion-dollar pockets. Again, but this time with a West Coast flavor, the problem is DoD’s culture.

Disruption does not come clean or easy. It requires making people in long-held institutions unhappy.

If DoD wants to move faster, it has a choice: It can disrupt institutions in Washington or disrupt institutions on the West Coast. But if it wants wholesale change, as leaders often claim, it will have to choose workers on one coast to make unhappy.”

https://www.c4isrnet.com/opinion/2018/05/15/silicon-valley-will-never-love-dod/

 

 

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A New Pentagon Cyberstrategy Unit Led by a Civilian & A Military Deputy

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The cyber-triad, as described by DOD’s new cyber strategy.

“MILITARY TIMES”

“Formally titled the “Defense Innovation Unit X,” the small command will be led by a civilian with a military deputy and staffed by an elite team of active-duty, reserve and civilian personnel, the defense official said. It will probably be located at Moffett Airfield, a former Navy base, in Silicon Valley, according to a senior defense official.

That team will “scout for breakthrough and emerging technologies; and function as a local interface node for the rest of the department. Down the road, they could potentially help startups find new ways to work with DoD,”  [Defense Secretary] Carter said.

On a trip to California’s Silicon Valley, Carter highlighted the risks of high-tech digital attacks, saying the Defense Department’s sophisticated weapons and the command-and-control networks that control them are “no good if they’ve been hacked.”

Similar ventures may follow in other areas with high-tech industries, including the New York City area, a senior defense official said.

Some reservists welcomed the proposal to ramp up the Pentagon’s presence in the nation’s technology hubs, which could help build up the cyber talent pool in the reserve components.

“There will be people who want to serve but they also don’t want to serve on active duty all the time. If the department is set up in areas where there are private-sector tech centers or academic tech centers, you are going to have a higher population of reservists who do this work already,” said Col. Mark DiTrolio, commander of the Army Reserve Information Operations Command, in an interview from his home in San Antonio.

The military services are about halfway toward their goal of creating an operational cyber force of about 6,200 troops by the end of next year. The long-term target size for the cyber force remains under discussion.

“We are still thinking about the right investment in the cyber mission force,” a senior defense official said. “We’ll be looking at that closely over the next year or so to see if we need increased investment in terms of personnel or technology.”

Carter’s trip to Silicon Valley — the first for a defense secretary in nearly 20 years — was the latest sign that he is making a focus on cyber capabilities central to his tenure in the military’s top civilian job.

After taking over the post in February, Carter spoke at U.S. Cyber Command headquarters in Maryland and suggested the command could someday break off to form a separate military service.

In March, he suggested a slate of far-reaching reforms to the military’s antiquated personnel system that could help DoD better compete with the private sector for the top talent in the cyber field.

The 33-page official cyber strategy that the Pentagon released April 23 was the first major update since 2011.

After his speech, Carter met with Facebook chief operating officer Cheryl Sandberg, followed by a visit to Andreessen Horowitz, a major Valley venture capitalist firm.”

http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/pentagon/2015/04/23/pentagon-cyber-strategy-silicon-valley-ashton-carter/26256877/