Tag Archives: Volunteering

Tips On Finding That Perfect Mentor

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Image: Micro Mentor https://www.micromentor.org/

MICROMENTOR

Congratulations! You’ve taken the leap and registered on the MicroMentor platform. Now you’re ready to find the perfect mentor to help your business grow and meet its goals. Now what? How can you make the most out of your MicroMentor experience? 

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  1. Create a strong profile: When creating your profile, be sure to give a simple explanation of your business. Be sure to include your business vision, mission, needs, and the problem you’re trying to solve. It’s also not a bad idea to upload a professional photo to invoke confidence for potential mentors. Entrepreneurs that follow these steps are 10 times more likely to find a mentor, so make sure you create the most compelling profile that you can.
  2. Be patient: Finding the perfect mentor may require patience. If you don’t receive a response from a potential mentor right away, don’t be discouraged. They are graciously donating their time and may be unable to get back to you due to busy schedules. It’s also advisable that you reach out to various mentors to improve your chances of finding the perfect mentor. Keep trying! It’ll be worth the wait.
  3. Don’t rush: Once you’ve identified a mentor, don’t rush through the “getting to know you” phase. Ask him or her questions about their experience and how they got to where they are today. Tell them more about yourself and why you decided to start your business or come up with your business idea. Building a solid foundation will help your mentor to better understand how to help you, and you’ll be more comfortable when you put into the action the next piece of advice to…
  4. Have a clear vision of what you want to gain from your mentor/mentee relationship: When you begin your search for a mentor, there’s a few questions you should consider. Think about what dynamic you hope to have with your mentor. How will both of you feel more comfortable communicating? And how often? How can they help you accomplish your business goals and the benchmarks you have set? How can they help you track your progress and reach your personal deadline? Your mentorship will be more productive and fruitful if you and your mentor can come to agreement on a game plan.
  5. Have an open mind and follow through: Our mentors are here to help you think outside of the box to solve your business problems. Keep an open mind when receiving their feedback, as they could encourage you to think outside of the box and offer you advice you need to better your business and help differentiate yourself from your competitors. Mentor Eleftheria Egel’s experience on MicroMentor has shown her the importance of being “open-minded, respectful and patient”. “There is no right and wrong. It is simply a different way of doing things. It may take a little more time to coordinate. However, if mentor and mentee are aligned in their vision and goals, the whole relationship and experience will run smoothly and successfully”, she explains.

MicroMentor understands that owning your own business, while rewarding, can be challenging. We also believe that mentoring is a powerful resource for entrepreneurs to receive the guidance they need so that they’re not navigating their journey alone. To learn more about how MicroMentor has already helped our community of entrepreneurs, have a look at our 2019 Impact Report.”

https://www.micromentor.org/blog/making-the-most/

The Largest Generation in American History is Committed to Volunteering

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“WILD APRICOT”

“In  terms of sheer size, Millennials  (Birthday 1980 – 2000) have overtaken Baby Boomers and are now the largest generation in American history – estimated at 83 million strong. And according to a recent blog post, The Future of Fundraising: What a Difference Five Years will Make, even though the oldest Millennial is only now reaching 30, you need to start building relationships with this group, since they will be prime donors, supporters and volunteers in about five years.

http://www.wildapricot.com/blogs/newsblog/2011/08/01/engaging-younger-supporters

“WASHINGTON POST” “Tired of hearing people grouse about a tuned-out, apathetic younger generation? Well, here’s a comeback: America’s young adults are more serious about giving back than their parents were. In fact, those under age 30 now are more likely to say citizens have a “very important obligation” to volunteer, an Associated Press-GfK poll finds. The embrace of volunteering is striking because young people’s commitment to other civic duties — such as voting, serving on a jury and staying informed — has dropped sharply from their parents’ generation and is lower than that of Americans overall.

Among six civic activities in the AP-GfK poll, volunteering is the only one that adults under 30 rated as highly as older people did. Today’s young adults grew up amid nudges from a volunteering infrastructure that has grown exponentially since their parents’ day, when the message typically came through churches or scouting. In the decades since President George H.W. Bush championed America’s volunteer groups as “a thousand points of light” at his 1989 inaugural, the number of nonprofits has skyrocketed.

The Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and Sept. 11 have become days of service. Individuals launch community projects through social media, instead of hanging posters and making phone calls. Twenty percent of adults under 30 volunteered in 2013, up from 14 percent in 1989, according to census data analyzed by the Corporation for National and Community Service. It seems likely that the millennials’ volunteering rate will climb higher, because past generations have peaked in their 30s and 40s, when many parents give their time to schools, youth groups or community improvements. “We’re on the crux of something big, because these millennials are going to take this spirit of giving and wanting to change communities, and they’re going to become parents soon,” said Wendy Spencer, chief executive of the Corporation for National and Community Service. “I am very encouraged by what we’re seeing.”

The vast majority of Americans believe citizenship comes with an array of responsibilities. But the strength of that conviction has weakened since the General Social Survey asked about obligations of citizenship in 1984.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/young-adult-americans-committed-to-volunteering-poll-finds/2014/12/29/571542ae-8fb9-11e4-ba53-a477d66580ed_story.html