Tag Archives: Veterans

How Does A Combat Vet Feel When Hearing A Civilian Say, “We Shouldn’t Be Over There, We Should Worry About Ourselves”?

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Rose Covered Glasses”  

“The civilian must accept his or her role in the issue. Elected representatives appropriate money and approve U.S. activities in other countries.

Solders go where they are ordered by their commander. If the civilian wishes change, then change can be at hand if the elected official is contacted and a strong input from the citizenry makes the demand heard.”

Quora Veterans Opinions on Today’s Warfare

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“FOREIGN POLICY”

“Asking warriors to do everything poses great dangers for our country — and the military. Our armed services have become the one-stop shop for America’s policymakers.

Here’s the vicious circle in which we’ve trapped ourselves: As we face novel security threats from novel quarters — emanating from nonstate terrorist networks, from cyberspace, and from the impact of poverty, genocide, or political repression, for instance — we’ve gotten into the habit of viewing every new threat through the lens of “war,” thus asking our military to take on an ever-expanding range of nontraditional tasks.

But viewing more and more threats as “war” brings more and more spheres of human activity into the ambit of the law of war, with its greater tolerance of secrecy, violence, and coercion — and its reduced protections for basic rights.”

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Things Veterans Could Get For The Price Of A Parade

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Homeless Vet Marketwatch dot com

Image: Marketwatch.com

“TASK AND PURPOSE”

“Instead of sending service members out into the streets…………… consider helping homeless veterans off of them.

Even the parade’s uber-thrifty low-end price projection, $10 million, is enough to give thousands of struggling veterans a “thank you” that really means something.”


“A Department of Defense memo sent to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford of March 9 laid out the plans for a sprawling military parade in Washington, D.C. for Veterans Day on November 11th, 2018. In addition to requiring active-duty service-members to cram into their dress uniforms and stand by to stand by to stand by for hours on end, the parade would have a whopping price tag of somewhere between $10 and $30 million, according to the White House.

This is a puzzling proposition — and not just because the last time the U.S. enjoyed a military parade was after our last actual victory, following the conclusion of the Gulf War in 1991. Indeed, planning the big, fanfare-swaddled spend for Veterans Day seems like something of an insult to the estimated 40,056 veterans who are homeless on any given night, according to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) estimates.

Here’s what else that marching-around money could do:

Feed America’s Homeless Veterans For a Month

As Newsweek points out, the average cost of a single hot meal in the U.S. clocks in at $2.94 (although it can jump as high as $5.61, depending on where you live). That comes out to more than 3.4 million hot meals, or 84 square feasts for each homeless veteran in the U.S. — enough to feed each hungry ex-warfighter three times a day for 28.3 days. I’m not sure about you, but I’d take eating for a month over a dumb parade any day.

Give Vets Some  Rent Money

Rental assistance currently helps more than 340,000 veterans to afford decent housing — and, according to a 2014 report, has reduced veteran homelessness by 33% since 2010. But that housing assistance has been imperiled in recent months: In December, Politico reported that the VA planned to divert $460 million specifically set aside for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program, which provides vets with housing vouchers. (The VA officially did an about-face on that plan in February after a public outcry, but the department’s initial thinking suggests those funds are negotiable.)

Forking over $10 million in erstwhile parade money could help. A landlord of a single HUD-VASH voucher recipient in, say, New York City, could expect to see $1,256 a month, with up to $1,500 in one-time incentives for choosing a vet over another Section 8 applicant. Heck, that’s enough to put roughly 3,600 vets up in the Big Apple for a month — long enough to get sweet jobs blogging with us!

Give major homeless Vet Centers a Big Fat Endowment

There are a 30 VA-funded Community Resource and Referral Centers (CRRCs) across the country that offer services related to health and mental health care, housing support, career assistance, and access to benefits for homeless veterans. And they’re essential: 29,000 vets received assistance through CRRCs in 2015, according to VA data.

A nice fat $330,000 check for each facility could do a lot of long-term good — especially if the money, say, funds endowments to allow each center to further expand, regardless of future budget woes in Washington. Why the VA doesn’t have its own endowment boggles the mind, unless it’s because the next war will be fought by pointy-headed Harvard intellectuals. (Just kidding; they plan the wars; they don’t fight em.)”

https://taskandpurpose.com/trump-parade-cost-veterans-services/

 

 

 

 

 

Captain Maggie Seymour Ran 100 Days for Veterans, Special-Needs Athletes, And Gold Star Families

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Maggie Seymour

Maggie Seymour
Courtesy photo

“TASK AND PURPOSE”

“Maggie Seymour is a captain in the Marine Corps Reserves and a current doctoral candidate at Old Dominion University.

After leaving active duty in 2017, she ran across the country in 100 days to support veterans, Gold Star families, and special-needs athletes.”


“On July 22, I ended my active-duty service with the Marine Corps and started a 100-day run across the country. I decided to leave the Corps for a variety of reasons; some cultural, some personal, but mostly because I didn’t want to move every three years. I was tired of rebuilding a life and community with every PCS. In that same sense of community and service, I wanted my last PCS to be a tribute to the communities that had embraced me over my time on active duty. I set out to raise $50,000 for veterans, special-needs athletes, and Gold Star families.

Going into this run, I was woefully under trained, slightly overweight, and more than a little arrogant — not unlike many service members transitioning to civilian life. So it was to even my own surprise that on Oct. 28, I reached the Atlantic Ocean, relatively injury-free and on schedule.

It has been a month since I finished and I am still not sure how I did it, but I have a feeling it was through a little bit of luck, a lot of stubbornness, and my military training. As it turns out, the Marine Corps did a pretty good job in preparing me for that grueling 2,850-mile trek.

Here’s five ways how:

Bearing

I called it grace, but bearing would be appropriate, too. The Marine Corps teaches bearing in any number of ways. I learned to keep a straight face and cool head mostly by counseling Marines through some notoriously bad decisions, like the time my chief intentionally impregnated his mistress, while still married. Or when that same chief held a “commitment ceremony” with his pregnant girlfriend, again while still married. Overcoming those experiences prevented me from completely losing my shit when on Day 64 of this run, my support driver drove to the day’s end point instead of the start point, wasting an hour of the blessed cool morning air. It allowed me to stay in control when that sweet old lady in Virginia hit me with her car. There is a strength in being able to remain calm, especially when everything around (or inside you) is going apeshit.

Flexibility

Pick a cliché: Go for the 80% solution. Semper Gumby. No plan survives first contact with the enemy. They all mean the same thing: The Marine Corps changes. A lot. Orders get modified hours before the movers show up. The movers don’t show up. The movers show up drunk. All of these changes force us to learn how to flex. I started the run in July and reached the California desert by the second day, unprepared to face the searing heat that even most American tourists know to steer clear of — clearly understanding weather isn’t my forte. In the desert, everything is trying to kill you: the sun, the sand, the animals, even the plants (jumping chollas, anyone?). My enemy became the rocks and sand, the goat trails and wadis, my blisters, and always my own mind. So, my crew and I flexed. I began running at night to avoid the heat of the day. We adjusted the route to make the timeline. My crew bought safety vests, cooling towels, and a second cooler. When one route didn’t pan out, we found another. When the van needed a repair, we called friends. When we hit a fence, a mounter, or a herd of cattle — we went over, around, or under it.

Land Navigation

As if running in the desert in the dead of the night wasn’t bad enough, the desert between eastern California and Phoenix has very few roads suitable or legal for pedestrians. In some stretches of the trek, there were no viable roads at all. Luckily my crew and I know how to read a map and use a compass (or rather the compass app on the iPhone) and picked our way across the desert, avoiding becoming those lost lieutenants, or in this case lost captains. Thanks to The Basic School.

The ability to suffer monotony

At the end of each day, my crew would congratulate me on another day down. I’d bitterly ask what my reward was. Cheerfully, they would reply, “You get to do it again tomorrow!” Running 33 miles a day for 99 days was my own personal Groundhog Day from Hell. It reminded me a lot of deployments; the days were long, but the weeks were short, no matter how miserably monotonous. Every Marine — from a staff officer preparing commander’s update brief slides and non-judicial punishments to the infantry lance corporal cleaning his weapon — knows the feeling. The level of tedium experienced day after day in the Marines kills motivation and feeds misery. Luckily the Corps gives you company in your suffering. Shared torment reminds you that you’re not alone and that someone always had it worse. When the monotony of the run became nearly unbearable, I always had a friend to reach out to — someone who reminded me that it could be worse.

Success is a team effort

When the 1995 VW Eurovan camper named Diana that was meant to carry my support driver, running partners, me, and my gear broke down the day before the launch of the run, I started to panic. Luckily my friends — also Marines — stepped in. One friend lent me a Jeep. Another called a tow truck so that Diana could make the launch party. Other friends transferred my coolers and running gear from the van to the loaner Jeep and kept me calm. Throughout the run, this teamwork was a running (pun intended) theme. My crew made me weird potato-chip sandwiches, ran my ice baths, and even rubbed my feet. Friends from afar sent me messages, linked me up with places to stay at different stops of the journey, and spread the word about my mission. Everyone chipped in with whatever support they could. I got through this run the same way I got through any tough challenge in the Marine Corps. I asked for help. I asked for a lot of help, from a lot of different people. I reached out to those people who knew what they were doing, I reached out for logistical support, emotional support, medical advice, or just simple encouragement.”

http://taskandpurpose.com/marine-corps-prepared-run-across-country-100-days/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=ebb-1/2&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Early%20Bird%20Brief

 

 

 

VA Study Shows Parasite From Vietnam May Be Killing Vets

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Vietnam Parasites

This Sept. 7, 2016, photo shows a display of preserved liver fluke parasites at the Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Cholangiocarcinoma, a rare form of bile duct cancer, is linked to liver fluke parasites in raw or poorly cooked river fish. (Sakchai Lalit/AP)

“MILITARY TIMES”

“A half a century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a new reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet — test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia.

The Department of Veterans Affairs this spring commissioned a small pilot study to look into the link between liver flukes ingested through raw or undercooked fish and a rare bile duct cancer.”


It can take decades for symptoms to appear. By then, patients are often in tremendous pain, with just a few months to live.

Of the 50 blood samples submitted, more than 20 percent came back positive or bordering positive for liver fluke antibodies, said Sung-Tae Hong, the tropical medicine specialist who carried out the tests at Seoul National University in South Korea.

“It was surprising,” he said, stressing the preliminary results could include false positives and that the research is ongoing.

Northport VA Medical Center spokesman Christopher Goodman confirmed the New York facility collected the samples and sent them to the lab. He would not comment on the findings, but said everyone who tested positive was notified.

Gerry Wiggins, who served in Vietnam from 1968 to 1969, has already lost friends to the disease. He was among those who got the call.

“I was in a state of shock,” he said. “I didn’t think it would be me.”

The 69-year-old didn’t have any symptoms when he agreed to take part in the study, but hoped his participation could help save lives. He immediately scheduled further tests, discovering he had two cysts on his bile duct, which had the potential to develop into the cancer, known as cholangiocarcinoma. They have since been removed and — for now — he’s doing well.

Though rarely found in Americans, the parasites infect an estimated 25 million people worldwide.

FILE - This combination of file photos provided by their families shows some of the hundreds of U.S. veterans of the Vietnam War who suffered from cholangiocarcinoma, a rare bile duct cancer believed to be linked to liver fluke parasites in raw or poorly cooked river fish. This cancer takes decades to manifest itself. Top row from left are Andrew G. Breczewski, Arthur R. Duhon Sr., Clarence E. Sauer, Dennis Anthony Reinhold, Donald Edward Fiechter, George Jardine, Horst Alexander Koslowsky, Hugo Rocha and James Robert Zimmerman. Second row from left are James Vincent Kondreck, John J. Skahill Jr., Johnny Herald, Leonard H. Chubb, Louis A. DiPietro, Mario Petitti, Mark M. Lipman, Marvin H. Edwards and Michael Kimmons. Third row from left are Mike Brown, Paul Smith, Pete Harrison, Peter D. Antoine, Ralph E. Black, Ricardo Ortiz Jr., Richard Anthony Munoz, Robert J. Fossett Jr. and Robert L. Boring. Fourth row from left are Robert Lee Phelps, Ronald Lee Whitman, Thomas F. Brock, Thomas Michael Cambron, Thomas R. Kitchen Jr., W. Roy Leuenberger, Wayne Lagimoniere, William Boleslaw Klimek and William Francis Hanlon Jr. (AP)
FILE – This combination of file photos provided by their families shows some of the hundreds of U.S. veterans of the Vietnam War who suffered from cholangiocarcinoma, a rare bile duct cancer believed to be linked to liver fluke parasites in raw or poorly cooked river fish. This cancer takes decades to manifest itself. Top row from left are Andrew G. Breczewski, Arthur R. Duhon Sr., Clarence E. Sauer, Dennis Anthony Reinhold, Donald Edward Fiechter, George Jardine, Horst Alexander Koslowsky, Hugo Rocha and James Robert Zimmerman. Second row from left are James Vincent Kondreck, John J. Skahill Jr., Johnny Herald, Leonard H. Chubb, Louis A. DiPietro, Mario Petitti, Mark M. Lipman, Marvin H. Edwards and Michael Kimmons. Third row from left are Mike Brown, Paul Smith, Pete Harrison, Peter D. Antoine, Ralph E. Black, Ricardo Ortiz Jr., Richard Anthony Munoz, Robert J. Fossett Jr. and Robert L. Boring. Fourth row from left are Robert Lee Phelps, Ronald Lee Whitman, Thomas F. Brock, Thomas Michael Cambron, Thomas R. Kitchen Jr., W. Roy Leuenberger, Wayne Lagimoniere, William Boleslaw Klimek and William Francis Hanlon Jr. (AP)

Endemic in the rivers of Vietnam, the worms can easily be wiped out with a handful of pills early on, but left untreated they can live for decades without making their hosts sick. Over time, swelling and inflammation of the bile duct can lead to cancer. Jaundice, itchy skin, weight loss and other symptoms appear only when the disease is in its final stages.

The VA study, along with a call by Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of New York for broader research into liver flukes and cancer-stricken veterans, began after The Associated Press raised the issue in a story last year. The reporting found that about 700 veterans with cholangiocarcinoma have been seen by the VA in the past 15 years. Less than half of them submitted claims for service-related benefits, mostly because they were not aware of a possible connection to Vietnam. The VA rejected 80 percent of the requests, but decisions often appeared to be haphazard or contradictory, depending on what desks they landed on, the AP found.

The numbers of claims submitted reached 60 in 2017, up from 41 last year. Nearly three out of four of those cases were also denied, even though the government posted a warning on its website this year saying veterans who ate raw or undercooked freshwater fish while in Vietnam might be at risk. It stopped short of urging them to get ultrasounds or other tests, saying there was currently no evidence the vets had higher infection rates than the general population.

“We are taking this seriously,” said Curt Cashour, a spokesman with the Department of Veterans Affairs. “But until further research, a recommendation cannot be made either way.”

Veteran Mike Baughman, 65, who was featured in the previous AP article, said his claim was granted early this year after being denied three times. He said the approval came right after his doctor wrote a letter saying his bile duct cancer was “more likely than not” caused by liver flukes from the uncooked fish he and his unit in Vietnam ate when they ran out of rations in the jungle. He now gets about $3,100 a month and says he’s relieved to know his wife will continue to receive benefits after he dies. But he remains angry that other veterans’ last days are consumed by fighting the same government they went to war for as young men.

“In the best of all worlds, if you came down with cholangiocarcinoma, just like Agent Orange, you automatically were in,” he said, referring to benefits granted to veterans exposed to the toxic defoliant sprayed in Vietnam. “You didn’t have to go fighting.”

Baughman, who is thin and weak, recently plucked out “Country Roads” on a bass during a jam session at his cabin in West Virginia. He wishes the VA would do more to raise awareness about liver flukes and to encourage Vietnam veterans to get an ultrasound that can detect inflammation.

“Personally, I got what I needed, but if you look at the bigger picture with all these other veterans, they don’t know what necessarily to do,” he said. “None of them have even heard of it before. A lot of them give me that blank stare like, ‘You’ve got what?’”

https://www.militarytimes.com/veterans/2017/11/21/va-study-shows-parasite-from-vietnam-may-be-killing-vets/

“Warrior Games” Help Veterans Adapt

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Warrior Games

“ARMY TIMES”

“Former Tech Sgt. Joshua Miller and Capt. Mitchell Kieffer, both medically retired, suffered significant injuries during their time in service. 

Those injuries led to a string of surgeries for both veterans and, ultimately, a choice: between reaching out to overcome those injuries or to isolate themselves.”



“Two Air Force veterans who were severely injured during their service, and who suffered from the “invisible wounds” of post-traumatic stress, said they had to overcome fear of the stigma sometimes associated with getting help ― and their own pride ― to recover from their wounds. 

The airmen talked about their roads to recovery during the Air Space Cyber Conference at National Harbor, Md., Monday.

Smith joined the Air Force in 2003 as an aircrew flight equipment specialist and served on active duty for 13 years.

During Combat Survival School, he was injured after being thrown into a culvert, which led to surgeries on both hips, his right shoulder and elbow.

When a friend suggested he join the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program, Smith hesitated because he felt his non-combat injuries didn’t warrant joining the program. He didn’t “fit the bill” of those wounded in combat, he said.


“I felt [the program] was really sacred and that I didn’t belong,” Smith told the audience.
“But everybody has a story. It doesn’t matter if it’s combat or non-combat related,” he said. “So many airmen are kind of afraid to go to their first camp because of what they’re struggling or dealing with,” Smith said.


Being around others who can relate to what you’re going through makes it easier to share your stories and your feelings, he said.


Kieffer, who was injured while on a voluntary deployment with the Army Corps of Engineers in 2011, echoed those sentiments.


“Whenever we go to these [Wounded Warrior] camps and events, we know we’re not going to be judged,” said Kieffer.


He was part of a convoy that was attacked by an improvised explosive device, rocket-propelled grenades and small-arms fire. He sustained seven broken vertebrae and had memory issues. Because of this, Kieffer is rated 100 percent disabled.


For both men, dealing with their physical injuries was difficult, but dealing with the unseen wounds of post-traumatic stress was also quite tough. Perhaps the biggest reason troops don’t want to admit their unseen wounds is pride, they said. Their initial reaction is not to seek help but to tough it out.


“That’s been the biggest issue I’ve seen and dealt with,” Kieffer said. Pride has held a lot of recovery back,” he said. “Stop letting pride affect you.


Becoming involved with Warrior Games was a transformative experience for both airman, they said. Kieffer was the 2015 and 2016 ultimate champion, which is based on five athletic categories. of competition.


“Any time you have the opportunity to tell your story, tell it,” said Chief Master Sgt. Nicole Johnson, chief of the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program. “Your story will help others tell theirs.”


http://www.armytimes.com/news/air-force-times/2017/09/18/letting-go-of-pride-air-force-vets-adapt-to-invisible-wounds/

Female Veteran Business Leaders Share Tips for Success

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Female Veteran Business Leaders

Photo Credit: Master Sgt. Jenifer Calhoun/Air Force

“MILITARY TIMES” By Leo Shane III

“Highlights of last month’s Women Veterans Leadership Summit organized by The Mission Continues was a panel from prominent business leaders on how to navigate the transition from military life to civilian careers.

Below are excerpts from that event, designed to focus on ways women leaving the service can use their experience to succeed in workplaces very different than their military posts:

** Know your mission

Amy Gravitt, executive vice president at HBO Programming, is a Navy veteran who served on board the USS Constellation in Persian Gulf:

“It was quite a change going from the Navy to the entertainment industry. I took an unpaid internship with a production company. So I went from being a lieutenant and having a ton of responsibility and having people who worked for me to being the low man on the totem pole, by far.

“What got me my start in the industry and got me to where I am now is that I was the best intern. I went into this industry that was a mess and had no systems in place, and I started organizing it like my division on the ship …

“The company I worked for was George Clooney and Steven Soderberg’s company, and there were a lot of eager film students there who wanted to talk to them about films and ideas. And I knew they did not want to hear my ideas. They weren’t interested in me pitching them movies.

“So, I did the job that made their lives easier, and I was recognized for that.”

** Appreciate your service

Paula Boggs, founder of Boggs Media, served as an Army attorney and later when on to roles in the U.S. Attorney’s office and various technology firms.

“By the time I got to Dell, there were very few people who had military experience. I was like a unicorn. But because of that, there was heightened awareness of who the military was and what they were doing. And this was pre-9/11.

“A lot of tech companies are heavily male. So I was a unicorn in the sense of being a veteran, and a unicorn in the sense of being a woman. All the greater in figuring out how to capitalize on those two things in a setting like that…

“As a team building exercise, we were doing war games, playing Army … There was a moment when Michael Dell, founder of the company, just stopped and said, ‘Guys, Paula really did this!’ And you’d see this awe, this transformative moment. ‘She did something we can only play at.’

“Never underestimate how special being a veteran is, particularly in this post 9/11 environment … There’s this moment now in the country where veterans are not understood, but there is an elevated awareness of who you are and the specialness of the service you have given.”

** Embrace the civilian workplace

Nana Adae, executive director at JP Morgan Private Bank, spent seven years in the Navy specializing in communications and signals, including assignments in Japan, Greece and Spain.

“One of the things that I stress is that people just need to know you, because if it’s all about whether or not people like you, that’s a very superficial way of thinking about how you’re going to be judged.

“And unfortunately as women, I think a lot of times we put our head down. We just want to work. We don’t want to have any of the noise about who we really are or what’s going on with us because that might complicate things.

“But truthfully, in the work environment, the more successful people are the people who are known.”

** Don’t exaggerate your skills or limitations

Gravitt: “You’ll make a million mistakes along the way … so don’t be too eager to move up quickly. Make sure you’re ready to ride without the training wheels before you take them off.”

“When you make a mistake, apologize once and move on. Nobody else is going to obsess about your mistake, so you shouldn’t. Just figure out what you can learn from it.

“It doesn’t mean you have terrible instincts. It doesn’t mean that you’re bad at your job. It just means that you made a mistake. People do it all the time.”

** Keep looking for mentors

Boggs: “One of the most powerful mentors for me was my last assignment. I worked in the White House on the Iran-Contra investigation. My boss was a civilian, middle-aged white guy. I was a 20-something black female.

“On the surface, not like me at all. But saw something in me that reminded him of himself, and became my champion for the first 15 years of my career.”

“Years later, someone wrote an article where I called him the most significant mentor of my career. He called me and said, ‘Paula, I never considered myself your mentor. You were just my friend.’ But he was that to me.”

“Mentors can be everywhere … keep an active peripheral vision, because you just never know.”

http://www.militarytimes.com/articles/mission-continues-business-advice-women-veterans

Leo Shane III covers Congress, Veterans Affairs and the White House for Military Times. He can be reached at lshane@militarytimes.com.

U.S. Xpress Offers Truck Driver Apprenticeship Program for Vets

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U.S. XPress Apprenticeship Program

Image: ” U.S. Xpress”

“U.S. Xpress launched its Military Recruitment Initiative back in July 2016 as part of the company’s commitment to providing veterans with an opportunity to start a new career in the growing logistics industry.

Don Davis and his wife, Rebekah nearly doubled their combined income when the two military veterans became commercial truck drivers and started making long-haul trips between Chicago and the East Coast for the Chattanooga-based U.S. Xpress Enterprises.

“We’re used to being away from home in the military,” said Dan Davis, a 33-year-old veteran of the Army and Navy who twice served in Iraq. “Truck driving is definitely a great career if you don’t mind spending time by yourself, which a lot of us did in the military.”

Davis used his GI bill to get his commercial drivers license through a truck driving school and continues to receive GI benefits to supplement his income through a veterans apprenticeship program that U.S. Xpress joined last month.

As part of the Post 9/11 GI Bill Apprenticeship Program, veterans may receive tax-free educational benefits while training with U.S. Xpress to become truck drivers or diesel technicians. Participants can receive up to $25,700 from the Veterans Administration over a two-year period, depending on their years of military service, on top of their salary from U.S. Xpress.

Professional truck drivers can usually expect to earn between $50,000 and $70,000 based upon which driving opportunity the veteran qualifies for at U.S. Xpress. Combined with the GI Bill benefits, military veterans in the apprenticeship program can earn up to $82,000 in their first year with the company.

If a veteran chooses to enter the program as a diesel technician, they can expect to earn between $35,000 and $50,000 depending upon experience and performance.

The GI bill benefits, which typically take 90 days or so to process, are granted tax-free to the recipients.

Wayne Roy, a 31-year-old Marine who served from 2004 to 2008 as a motor mechanic in the military, joined U.S. Xpress last August after going through truck driving school and is able to supplement his drivers’ pay with what is left on his GI Bill.

“I love to travel, and this helps me make this transition into what I hope to make my career,” Roy said.

U.S. Xpress hopes more veterans use their GI Bill benefits to go into truck driving. According to the American Trucking Association, the industry needs at least 25,000 more truck drivers, and the shortage of drivers is likely to increase as qualified drivers age and retire and the demand for truck shipments increases along with the economy.

“We value the strong work ethic and leadership experience veterans can bring to our company,” said Eric Fuller, chief operating officer for U.S. Xpress. “Beyond that, veterans have a sense of productivity, accountability and a ‘can-do’ attitude that will serve them well in trucking, which is why we look to hire veterans in every aspect of our company.”

U.S. Xpress launched its Military Recruitment Initiative back in July 2016 as part of the company’s commitment to providing veterans with an opportunity to start a new career in the growing logistics industry.

“Our veterans have always played an essential role in keeping our country strong, and now, we want veterans to put their skills to work as a U.S. Xpress truck driver and serve our country in a new way — one that will help keep the transportation industry moving forward and our economy strong,” said Fuller.

“I truly believe our new apprenticeship program will help make this possible by giving veterans added financial stability as they transition out of the military and into a new career.”

https://www.stripes.com/news/veterans/u-s-xpress-offers-apprenticeship-program-for-vets-to-fill-truck-driver-jobs-1.457208#.WL296W_yvcs

 

Wells Fargo Military Rights Violations

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wells-fargo-and-the-service

“THE HILL”

“Violations took place for more than seven years through 2015

The bank, which generated $86 billion in revenue last year, will pay $20 million to the Treasury Department, $60,000 to a federal fund, and $10,000 to each affected service member.

The DOJ launched an investigation last year after receiving a complaint from the United States Army saying that Wells Fargo repossessed a used car owned by a National Guardsman in North Carolina. According to the complaint, the bank sold the car at public auction.

A lawyer for the National Guardsman requested information from Wells Fargo but never received a response, the DOJ said, sparking the review that uncovered a pattern of violations.

Catherine Pulley, a spokeswoman for Wells Fargo, said the bank has been notifying and compensating service members over the matter and will complete its work in 60 days.

“Wells Fargo is committed to ensuring all service member customers have the important SCRA protections and benefits available to them,” Pulley told The Hill Extra in an emailed statement Thursday. “In those instances where some service members did not receive the appropriate benefits and protections, we did not live up to our commitment and we apologize.”

The bank, which generated $86 billion in revenue last year, will pay $20 million to the Treasury Department, $60,000 to a federal fund, and $10,000 to each affected service member.

The $20 million penalty under the OCC settlement is unusually large for abuses of this particular law, the Service Members Civil Rights Act (SCRA), but the agency cited several factors such as the duration and frequency of violations, as well as the financial harm to service members.

News of the sanctions broke while Wells Fargo chief executive officer John Stumpf was on Capitol Hill for the second time in two weeks to face lawmakers angry over the opening of unauthorized accounts at the bank, a scandal that has rocked the industry this month.

Although unrelated to that scandal, the settlement involving service member loan violations adds to the growing list of woes that Wells Fargo has been dealing with in the aftermath, including multiple lawsuits and a probe into wage practices by the Department of Labor.”

http://thehill.com/policy/finance/298625-wells-fargo-to-pay-24m-over-military-loan-violations

 

 

A Veteran Suicide Every 72 Minutes

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Photo: Shawn Thew, epa

“USA Today”

“It’s a pace of killing unknown to most Americans and a source of national shame.

In one narrow category — 18- to 24-year-old male veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan and were VA patients — the suicide rate was 10 times the national average for all people.

Of 20 veteran suicides daily, just six were enrolled in VA health care.  A 46-page suicide analysis released by the Department of Veterans Affairs last month reveals just how swift this current of self-destruction is flowing, particularly for young veterans fresh from war.

A veteran is choosing death every 72 minutes, and the VA could be doing more to keep that person alive. When veterans manage to ask for help, too many of their calls are not getting through to VA’s suicide hotline (800-273-8255). The agency isn’t offering enough veterans the kind of cutting-edge treatment therapies that researchers are finally uncovering.

The statistics tell the tragic story. Veterans in 2014 were killing themselves at three times the rate of civilians and at a quickening pace, up by a third from 2001 to 2014. Most self-destructive are young male veterans in their 20s, who are dying at four times the rate of their civilian peers. Female veterans were 2.4 times more likely to choose suicide than civilian counterparts.

The dying is relentless. Iraq War veteran Tom Young, 30, lay down on Illinois train tracks last year after failing to reach someone at the VA hotline. Former police officer and Navy veteran Peter Kaisen, 76, shot himself in the parking lot of a veterans hospital on Long Island last month.

Young died at a time when some calls into the VA hotline were actually going tovoicemail, a problem since repaired. But too many calls today still roll over to less-prepared backup centers outside the VA.

The agency’s mammoth bureaucracy, second only to the Pentagon, has been slow to embrace new ideas, chief among them managing the urge to commit suicide and not just treating underlying illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder or severe depression.

When this kind of skills training is tailored to the individual veteran, it can be extremely effective in reducing suicide, according to Craig Bryan, head of the National Center for Veterans Studies at the University of Utah, and other scientists. The VA needs to move faster on this science, and on fresher ideas such as behavioral health clinics devoted to managing coping skills, much like dialysis centers manage kidney disease.

To be sure, the issue is complex, and VA has made progress: expanding mental health care staffing; developing computer algorithms to single out hardcore suicidal cases for special care; and pushing private doctors to query veterans about the emotional impact of their military service.

Of 20 veteran suicides daily, just six were enrolled in VA health care. The others either chose against going to the VA or were ineligible for its care.

Easy access to guns is another part of the problem. Two-thirds of male veterans who commit suicide use a firearm, compared with 52% of male civilians.

The answers to veteran suicides are “not meeting the demand,” says Paul Rieckhoff, founder and CEO of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. “We often compare it to the early days of the AIDS crisis, when the gay community especially felt like their friends were dying left and right, and people weren’t paying attention.”

Attention must be paid, by the presidential candidates and everyone else.”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/09/15/every-72-minutes-veteran-commits-suicide-our-view/90254596/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DFN%20EBB%209.16.16&utm_term=Editorial%20-%20Early%20Bird%20Brief

 

 

 

 

Pentagon & VA Struggle With Military Electronic Health Care

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Vets Electronic Health Care Maze

“FEDERAL NEWS RADIO”

“The Defense Department will delay the roll out of its forthcoming $4.6 billion electronic health record   [EHR] because of newly-discovered technical problems.

“Glitches in integrating the commercial software with the legacy systems the military services use to store and process patient data.”

The EHR, known as MHS Genesis, was originally slated to reach its initial operating capability at a handful of hospitals and clinics by early December, but that date will likely move back by a few months due to unexpected glitches in integrating the commercial software with the legacy systems the military services use to store and process patient data.

The department’s original schedule called for clinicians to move away from DoD’s legacy AHLTA and CHCS systems and begin using GENESIS on Dec. 6. The initial sites were to be Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington and the Oak Harbor Naval Hospital on Washington’s Whidbey Island.

Program officials will spend the next 30 days determining how serious the integration issues are before drawing up a new schedule, but they still intend to use those medical treatment facilities as the first sites for the new EHR, and for Washington hospitals and clinics at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Naval Hospital Bremerton to follow shortly thereafter.

Defense officials began system validation sessions with clinicians at Bremerton last month in order to begin gathering user feedback ahead of the launch. Cummings said they’d uncovered no major issues beyond the technical problems DoD and Leidos already identified.

And she said based on DoD’s market research, the glitches aren’t too unlike the integration problems major commercial health care systems have faced as they’ve tried to introduce new electronic health record systems.

“On average, even a commercial provider takes 15 to 18 months from contract award to implementation. I don’t think we’re seeing anything out of the norm,” she said. “I will say that what’s different about us is we’re adopting an enterprise solution. We can’t optimize GENESIS just for one military treatment facility, we’re doing this integration and these interfaces once, as opposed to a commercial hospital where they might have interfaces that are local.”

The Defense Department said the delay would not result in any increase to the project’s five-year $4.6 billion cost ceiling. And Cerner, the subcontractor on whose software Genesis is based said it saw no indication that the setback in initial operating capability would affect the overall schedule for a final rollout to DoD’s worldwide medical facilities.

“We’re pleased that we remain in good position for an on-time, enterprise-wide deployment and are able to facilitate this additional configuration and testing for the initial operating capability pilot sites so that the system is performing at an optimal level when scaled across all MHS facilities,” Marlene Bentley, a company spokeswoman said in an emailed statement.”

Technical problems delay rollout of DoD’s electronic health record

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